Tuesday, 28 May 2013

CLEEN Foundation Worried about Killings in Nasarawa

CLEEN Foundation said, the pocket of violence and incessant killings of security personnel and innocent members of the public in Nigeria is fast becoming a trend, indicating that the most recent being the killings of forty six police officers and ten officers of the Department of State Security Services were killed in Alakyyo Area of Nasarrawa State.
In a statement signed by its Executive Director Kemi Okenyodo, it said, the incident came barely a few weeks after similar killings in Bayelsa and Borno States. The right to life of every Nigerian including law enforcement and security personnel is guaranteed under the constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and it cannot be taken away unless as prescribed according to the laws.  “The perpetrators of the act must be accountable.”
It called for the need to urgently check the emerging trend of killing of law enforcement and security personnel in the country with a view to restoring the respect in the state, institutions and agencies.
“The CLEEN Foundation sympathises with the families, friends and colleagues of the officers of the Nigeria Police Force and other security agencies who were killed in Nassarawa State and wish to use this opportunity to call on the federal government to take more decisive steps to ensure the collective safety and security of all Nigerians including the law enforcement and security personnel .”

Most Nigerians want fuel subsidy to continue

LAGOS, Nigeria, May 28 (UPI) -- The CLEEN Foundation NGO reported that most Nigerians want fuel subsidies to continue.

The data were contained in a national survey report it conducted in collaboration with Afrobarometer Network and Ghana's Center for Democratic Development.

The survey revealed that more than 60 percent of 2,400 respondents supporting continuing the subsidy, The Premium Times reported.

The report contained a darker allegation, accusing government officials of being "major beneficiaries" of the nation's fuel subsidy. CLEEN Foundation Executive Director Kemi Okenyodo said the survey indicated that 52 percent of respondents from 36 Nigerian states identified government officials as major beneficiaries of the fuel subsidy, The Premium Times reported.

Okenyodo added the survey also determined that anti-corruption bodies in Nigeria reported that governmental interference to their activities.

Okenyodo said 2,400 respondents were interviewed in their homes using personal face-to-face interview and multistage sampling technique for the survey, with a probability sampling procedure used to void any known form of bias that might have affected the findings of the study.

Despite the skewed benefits of the subsidies Okenyodo said while announcing the results, "62 percent of Nigerians say government should maintain the fuel subsidy."


Read more: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Energy-Resources/2013/05/28/Most-Nigerians-want-fuel-subsidy-to-continue/UPI-61761369718340/#ixzz2Ua87Fb8t

Majority of Nigerians want petrol subsidy to continue- survey

subsidy protest
About 2,400 respondents participated in the survey.
Patience Ogbo
A vast majority of Nigerians want the federal government to continue to subsidise petrol, a survey conducted by three non-profit organizations has stated.
The survey revealed that over 60 per cent of 2,400 respondents believe that there is need for the subsidy to remain.
The Federal Government in January 2011 announced the removal of petrol subsidy leading to protests across Nigeria. The government eventually rescinded its decision and instead implemented a partial subsidy removal. The price per litre of petrol went up from N65 to N98 after the partial removal, although it would have been over N140 if the full subsidy withdrawal was implemented.
President Goodluck Jonathan has repeatedly said Nigerian economy cannot sustain payment for subsidy and reiterated his long term plan of total removal, which he explained will be done in phases. Nigeria spent over N1 trillion on petrol subsidies in 2012.
The survey
The Executive Director of CLEEN Foundation, Kemi Okenyodo, said the research was organized by the CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with the Afrobarometer Network, and the Center for Democratic Development CDD-Ghana. The result was presented at a press briefing on Wednesday in Lagos.
“The Afrobarometer (AB) is a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes toward democracy, governance, the economy, leadership, identity, and other related issues.
“The AB is an independent, non-partisan, African-based network of researchers. The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries. The Network has conducted “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries including Nigeria during 2011-2012,” she said.
The official said 2,400 respondents were interviewed in their homes using personal face-to-face interview and multi-stage sampling technique. To ensure adequate representation of adult Nigerians population, probability sampling procedure was used to neutralize any known form of bias that may affect the findings of the study.
Respondents were males and females, aged 18 years and above.
Interviews were conducted throughout week days and weekends, to ensure that respondents of all works of life were included in the sample.
Ms. Okenyodo added that the purpose of Afrobarometer survey in Nigeria is to measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environment. The goal is to give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.
“We went to the greatest length in quality control measures in order to ensure that the process of collecting and analyzing the data we are presenting today adhered to the highest possible international standard in reliability.
“The field administration of the survey questionnaire in Nigeria was handled by the Practical Sampling International (PSI), a reputable social research firm that has worked with the CLEEN Foundation and the
Afrobarometer network over the years and has conducted similar surveys for local and international organizations,” she said.
Survey results
The survey focused on five areas which include election, rotation of the presidency across the geo-political zones, creation of more states, corruption, and fuel subsidy.
“62 per cent of Nigerians say government should maintain the fuel subsidy,” Ms. Okenyodo said while announcing the results.
“The Nigerian public have the belief that creation of more States and Local government Areas will improve development of the country. 60 per cent of Nigerians approve the rotation of Presidency across regions against 40% who say anyone should contest for the office of the presidency regardless of the region; while majority of Nigerians say the quality of the 2011 general election in Nigeria is better than 2007 national elections.
“Also, wide majority of Nigerians say government officials benefit most from fuel subsidies and most Nigerian residents say it is difficult to start-up a small or medium scale business in Nigeria,”
Miss Okenyodo said. Kathy Addy, the representative of Center for Democratic Development (CDD), Ghana, stated that the research assists government in formulating policies that will prioritise the needs of the people.
“The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries. The Network is now conducting “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries including Algeria, Burundi, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Egypt, Guinea, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Togo, Tunisia, Sierra Leone, and Sudan during 2011-2012.
“The goal is to give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans,” she said.
The Senior Special Assistance to the Attorney General and Commissioner for Justice in Lagos State, Gbolahan Adeniran, applauded the researchers stating that the Lagos State Government has benefitted immensely from unbiased scientific researches geared towards meaningful developmental policies and implementation.
The research funders include the DFID, SIDA, USAID and the Mo Ibrahim Foundation.

Setting up small scale business in Nigeria is difficult -Survey

By Raji Adebayo
As a result of non availability of resources and lack of enabling environment for private sector to thrive, it has been revealed that it is very difficult to set up small and medium scales businesses in Nigeria.
This revelation was contained in a survey conducted by Afro Barometer, a non- governmental organization based in CDD Ghana in collaboration with CLEEN Foundation in Nigeria.
Presenting the result of the survey conducted in the 36 states of the federation including Abuja, the Executive Director of CLEEN Foundation, Ms Kemi Okenyodo and Kathy Addy of Afro Barometer disclosed that Nigeria has seen its wealth withered with little to show in the living conditions of the average human being due to corruption which has always been on the high side.
Addy disclosed that 70 percent of the respondents to the questionnaire on how to start small and medium scale business in Nigeria said that it was very difficult in Nigeria as a result of non availability of resources to start.
According to her, “economic development also depends on employment generation and when 70 percent said it is very difficult to set up small and medium scale business, it is a very serious issue and government should do something fast to put things in order in this regard.
“Government should provide enabling environment for private sector in such a way that there will be employment generation to enhance economic growth and development of the nation, thus, raising the standard of living of the masses”, she added.
Okenyodo disclosed that corruption has eaten deep in all facets of human endeavour in Nigeria, hence, creating bottleneck for both human and economic development in the country.
Disclosing beneficiaries from fuel subsidies in Nigeria, the survey revealed that ordinary citizens do not benefit from it because government officials, wealthy Nigerians and companies that import fuel are not interested in the welfare of ordinary Nigerians.
“The Afrobarometer survey sample in all the 36 states including Abuja showed that the poorest people benefit a bit is 3 percent, the bulk of the benefits went directly to government officials at 52 percent, wealthy Nigerians is 22 percent and fuel import companies is 20 percent”.
The report of the survey went back memory lane that on assumption of office in 1999, former President Olusegun Obasanjo saw corruption as a challenge to his government and established two Anti-corruption agencies, Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and Independent Corrupt Practices Commission (ICPC), yet there is still a wide perception of corruption in the country especially among incumbent political leaders.
It noted that the most worrisome about the level of corruption in the country is that the power of incumbency makes it very difficult to expose the corrupt acts being perpetrated by people who are in government or who have strong connection with the incumbent government.
Revealing findings of Afrobarometer on EFCC and ICPC, Okenyodo disclosed that 37 percent identified government interference as the major challenge of EFCC while 35 percent also identified government interference for ICPC.
“Corruption by personnel of ICPC is 29 percent, judicial corruption is 14 percent and those who said they do not know is 12 percent while only 9 percent identifying inadequate funds by the agency as the worst challenge.

Monday, 27 May 2013

Government Officials Biggest Beneficiaries of Fuel Subsidy, Study Reveals

Government officials are the major beneficiaries of fuel subsidy in Nigeria, a research conducted by the three non-profit, independent, Africa-based organisations has revealed.
According to Executive Director of CLEEN Foundation, leader of the threesome, Miss 'Kemi Okenyodo, the research was organised in collaboration with Afrobarometer Network and the Centre for Democratic Development (CDD), Ghana.
The Afrobarometer (AB), a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes towards democracy, governance, economy, leadership, identity and other related issues, conducted the first round of surveys in 12 countries between 1999 and 2001. The latest surveys were conducted between 2011 and 2012 in up to 35 countries, including Nigeria.

“Two thousand four hundred respondents were interviewed in their homes using personal, face-to-face interviews and multi-stage sampling technique,” Okenyodo said at a media briefing where the results were presented.
“To ensure adequate representation of adult Nigerian population, probability sampling procedure was used to neutralise any known form of bias that could affect the findings of the study. Respondents were males and females, aged 18 years and above.  Interviews were conducted throughout week days and weekends to ensure that respondents from all works of life were included in the sample.”

She explained that the purpose of Afrobarometer survey in Nigeria is to measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environment, while giving the public a voice in policy-making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy makers, policy advocates, civil society organisations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.
“We went to the greatest length in quality control measures in order to ensure that the process of collecting and analysing the data we are presenting today adhered to the highest possible international standards in reliability,” she said, adding that the field administration of the survey questionnaire in Nigeria was handled by Practical Sampling International (PSI), a reputable social research firm that has worked with CLEEN Foundation and Afrobarometer network over the years and has conducted similar surveys for local and international organisations.

Presenting the findings of the survey, which focused on five areas — election, rotation of the office of President, creation of more states, corruption and fuel subsidy — she said:

“Sixty-two per cent of Nigerians say government should maintain the fuel subsidy. The Nigerian public has the belief that creation of more states and local governments will improve development of the country.
“Sixty per cent of Nigerians approve the rotation of Presidency across regions, against 40 per cent who say anyone should contest for the office of President regardless of the region.
“While majority of Nigerians say the quality of the 2011 general elections in Nigeria was better than that of 2007, wide majority of Nigerians say government officials benefits most from fuel subsidies and most Nigerian residents say it is difficult to start a small or medium scale business in Nigeria.”
Also speaking, Kathy Addy, CDD’s representative noted that the research helps government in formulating policies that will prioritise the needs of the people, while Gbolahan Adeniran, the senior special assistant to the Lagos State Attorney General and Commissioner For Justice, applauded the researchers for the “immense benefits” of the “scientific, unbiased and development-oriented researches” to the state.

Source: http://flairng.com/index.php/news/item/599-government-officials-biggest-beneficiaries-of-fuel-subsidy-study-reveals

Afrobarometer Round 5 Survey On Nigeria Released

CLEEN Foundation has presented highlights of the Afrobarometer round 5 Survey of Nigeria, in collaboration with the Afrobarometer Network and the Center for Democratic Development CDD-Ghana.
The Afrobarometer (AB) is a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes toward democracy, governance, the economy, leadership, identity, and other related issues. The AB is an independent, non-partisan, African-based network of researchers. The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries.  The Network has conducted “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries including Nigeria during 2011-2012.
According to ‘Kemi Okenyodo, Executive Director, Cleen Foundation, two thousand four hundred (2,400) respondents were interviewed in their homes using personal face-to-face interview and multi-stage sampling technique, and to ensure adequate representation of adult Nigerians population, probability sampling procedure was used to neutralize any known form of bias that may affect the findings of the study.
“Respondents were males and females, age 18 years and above.  Interviews were conducted throughout week days and weekends, to ensure that respondents of all works of life were included in the sample.”
He noted that the purpose of Afrobarometer survey in Nigeria is to measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environment. The goal is to give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.            
“We went to the greatest length in quality control measures in order to ensure that the process of collecting and analyzing the data we are presenting today adhered to the highest possible international standard in reliability.”
He appealed to the media to give the widest publicity to the findings of this survey as that would contribute in making them available to stakeholders that need the information in addition to other measures we normally take in publicizing the results of this survey.
The survey stated that Majority of Nigerians believe the quality of April 2011 elections is better compared with the 2007 elections  and that on Rotation of Presidency,  Nigerians have a strong support for the rotation of Presidency across regions.
Whilst Majority admitted that Creation of more States will improve development of Nigeria, and creation of more Local government areas will improve development of local communities, Nigerians say Government interference the most important challenge for the Independent Corrupt Practices Commission and Economic and Financial Crimes Commission.

Wednesday, 22 May 2013

Results from the Afrobarometer Round 5 Survey in NIGERIA


What is the Afrobarometer?

The Afrobarometer (AB) is a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes toward democracy, governance, the economy, leadership, identity, and other related issues.

The AB is an independent, non-partisan, African-based network of researchers.

The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries.  The Network is now conducting “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries during 2011-2012.

Purpose: To measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environments in each country where it is implemented and across Africa.

Goal: To give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.


Country Coverage: 1999-2012

Round 1, 1999-2001, 12 countries
Southern Africa: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa,
     Zambia, Zimbabwe
West Africa: Ghana, Mali, Nigeria
East Africa: Tanzania, Uganda

Round 2, 2002-2003, 16 countries
Cape Verde, Kenya, Mozambique, Senegal

Round 3, 2005-2006, 18 countries
Benin, Madagascar

Round 4, 2008-2009, 20 countries
Burkina Faso, Liberia

Round 5, 2011-2013, up to 35 countries
 Algeria, Burundi, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Egypt, Guinea, Mauritius, Morocco, Niger, Togo, Tunisia, Sierra Leone, Sudan




Who is the Afrobarometer?

A Pan-African Network of survey researchers and analysts.
In each country there is a National Partner responsible for survey implementation.  In Nigeria, the National Partner is CLEEN Foundation.

Four Core Partners provide technical assistance and Network management:
Center for Democratic Development (CDD), Ghana
Institute for Development Studies (IDS), University of Nairobi, Kenya
Institute for Empirical Research in Political Economy (IREEP), Benin

Two Support Units for capacity building and quality assurance
Michigan State University
University of Cape Town

Round 5 Core Funders include
DFID
SIDA
USAID
Mo Ibrahim Foundation


Nationally representative sample of adult citizens
-all respondents are randomly selected
-every adult citizen has an equal and known chance of being selected

Face-to-face interviews in the language of the respondent’s choice

Standard survey instrument across all countries for comparability

The survey interviewed 2, 400 adult Nigerians; A sample of this size yields results with a margin of error of +/- 2% at a 95% confidence level.

Field work for Round 5 in Nigeria was conducted between 29th October and 30th November in 2012.

Afrobarometer’s work in Nigeria is coordinated by The CLEEN Foundation and field work was carried out by Practical Sampling International PSI.


Weighted
Un-weighted
Mean Age
Gender
Male
50%
50%
Female
50%
50%
Location
Urban
44%
44%
Rural
56%
56%
Education
None
16%
16%
Primary
15%
15%
Secondary
46%
46%
Higher
21%
21%






WELCOME REMARKS BY 'KEMI OKENYODO, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CLEEN FOUNDATION ON THE OCCASION OF THE FIRST MEDIA PRESENTATION OF THE AFROBAROMETER ROUND 5 SURVEY IN NIGERIA

Protocols
Gentlemen and ladies of the press:

May I on behalf of the CLEEN Foundation, warmly welcome you all to this important media presentation of highlights of the Afrobarometer round 5 Survey, being organized by the CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with the Afrobarometer Network and the Center for Democratic Development CDD-Ghana.
The Afrobarometer (AB) is a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes toward democracy, governance, the economy, leadership, identity, and other related issues. The AB is an independent, non-partisan, African-based network of researchers. The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries.  The Network has conducted “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries including Nigeria during 2011-2012.

Two thousand four hundred (2,400) respondents were interviewed in their homes using personal face-to-face interview and multi-stage sampling technique. To ensure adequate representation of adult Nigerians population, probability sampling procedure was used to neutralize any known form of bias that may affect the findings of the study. Respondents were males and females, age 18 years and above.  Interviews were conducted throughout week days and weekends, to ensure that respondents of all works of life were included in the sample.

What is the purpose of the Afrobarometer survey in Nigeria?
The purpose of Afrobarometer survey in Nigeria is to measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environment. The goal is to give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.




What is quality of the Data being presented?                             
We went to the greatest length in quality control measures in order to ensure that the process of collecting and analyzing the data we are presenting today adhered to the highest possible international standard in reliability.

Field Administration of Questionnaire
The field administration of the survey questionnaire in Nigeria was handled by the Practical Sampling International (PSI), a reputable social research firm that has worked with the CLEEN Foundation and the Afrobarometer network over the years and has conducted similar surveys for local and international organizations. 

Our appeal
We urge you to give the widest publicity to the findings of this survey as that would contribute in making them available to stakeholders that need the information in addition to other measures we normally take in publicizing the results of this survey. These include presentation of the findings to the government and other stakeholder in Nigeria, publishing them in newspapers, on the website and in working papers.

Once Again I thank you for coming.

'Kemi Okenyodo
Executive Director

Tuesday, 21 May 2013

PUBLIC PRESENTATION OF THE FINDINGS OF AFROBAROMETER ROUND 5 SURVEYS IN NIGERIA



The Afrobarometer (AB) is a comparative series of public opinion surveys that measure public attitudes toward democracy, governance, the economy, leadership, identity, and other related issues. The AB is an independent, non-partisan, African-based network of researchers. 

The first round of surveys took place in 1999-2001 in 12 countries.  The Network has conducted “Round 5” surveys in up to 35 countries during 2011-2012. 

The Purpose is to measure popular perspectives on the social, political, and economic environments in each country where it is implemented and across Africa. The goal is to give the public a voice in policy making processes by providing high-quality public opinion data to policy-makers, policy advocates and civil society organizations, academics, media, donors and investors, and ordinary Africans.

Afrobarometer’s work in Nigeria is coordinated and disseminated by The CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with other agencies in Nigeria. The field work for Round 5 survey in Nigeria was conducted by Practical Sampling International PSI between 29th October and 30th November in 2012 covering the 36 States of Nigeria and Abuja, the Federal Capital.

The CLEEN Foundation and the Afrobarometer Network wishes to invite you to the first public presentation of findings of the R5 survey in Nigeria.  
           
Date:               22nd May, 2013
Time:             10:00am
Venue:            De-Renaissance Hotel Obafemi Awolowo Way, by Coca-Cola Bus–stop, Ikeja Lagos

Friday, 17 May 2013

Insecurity: Looking beyond govt effort in S’East


By Anolu Vincent/Owerri
Mankind has traditionally been security conscious in any environment he finds himself, in recognition of the fact that life  is precious  and has no duplicate.
Growth and development in any part of the biosphere is predicated on reliable security network  which not only emboldens  man to settle  down, contrive  and evolve policies and programmes to realize  a stated  objective  but  also spares  him from  both  internal and external aggression.
Guided by the philosophy  of  the indispensability of dependable  security  structure, men of the pristine  stone   age even  went  further to  erect locally fabricated fence  around  their homes  to ward off wild  animals  that  could strike  unexpectedly while  hunting  for games and preys.
It is however an irony of fate that  contemporary  societies, despite  the influences of western technology  in the provision  of the basic  needs of man have had to contend  the nagging problem  of security.
The  consequences of fragile  and vitiated security structure in most nations  of the world had necessitated the ever increasing annual budgetary allocations  for security management.
Unfortunately, available indices indicate that there  seems  to be no light  at the end of the tunnel, leading  to fresh  contrivances and relentless clamour  for collaborations  between  the government and the  organized private sector  to tackle  the menace.
Against this background, a non-governmental organization (NGO) “Cleen Foundation,” which aims at promoting   public  safety, security  and accessible justice  in the country and the West African sub-region has come up with  some  far reaching measures to  curb the  social malaise.
According to the Executive  Director, ‘Keni  Okenvodo, society  needs  to be well  secured  when the government in power evolves and sustains economic policies and programmes capable  of preventing crises and conflicts.
According to her, security is about the survival, positive conditions of human existence, about peace, development, justice, whose absence creates the condition for conflict  and insecurity.
The NGO boss made the observation at a two-day summit on “Security and Governance challenges in the South East” held in Owerri.
One cannot agree less with  the NGO that 14 years  after the restoration of elected civilian government, serious  security  and governance challenges had persisted at the federal, state and  local  levels in the country.
This unquestionably has been  “exacerbated by the increasing spate of armed violence  and banditry  over widening  space and territories and apparent  inability  of the security  forces to restore  law and order, bring the perpetrators  to justice and reassure traumatized  public.”

Activist to Nigerians: demand security, good governance


Nigerians have been urged to demand security of lives and property as well as good governance.
The Chairman of the Governing Council of the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), Dr Chidi Odinkalu, made the call during a two-day summit on security and governance challenges in the Southeast, held in Owerri, the Imo State capital.
He attributed the growing security challenges across the country to inept leadership.
Odinkalu asked Nigerians to rise and insist on qualitative leadership that will guarantee the protection of lives and property.
The activist noted that the inability of the government to provide employment for the teeming youths has fuelled criminality in not only in the Southeast but across the country.
He said: “In Nigeria, we are not only faced with the threats of terrorism but also serious issues of human right abuses in our homes and offices, which often spills over into the larger society.
“The time has come for the people to rise and demand for good governance and improved security, which, of course, is their right”.
Presenting a paper at the summit organised by a Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO), CLEEN Foundation in collaboration with the Nigeria Governors’ Forum (NGF) and Ford Foundation, Dr. Ukoha Ukiwo of the University of Port Harcourt, blamed insecurity in the Southeast on the increasing number of Ndigbo who were displaced in the cities as a result of urban renewal and safety city programme.
He said as a result of the demolition of homes and business places of most Igbo youths in major cities, the population of displaced persons who were forced to return to the Southeast increased with its attendant consequences.
Also speaking, the regional representative of the Ford Foundation, Innocent Chukwumah, noted that the huge decline in the socio-economic development in the zone was largely responsible for the current security situation.
Chukwuma said the traditional self-help development efforts of the Igbo should be complemented by the government for good governance to thrive.
He urged the participants to come up with a declaration on how to rescue the zone from the claws of criminals.

Monday, 6 May 2013

Removal of roadblocks reduced corruption in police by 80 Per cent, says IGP


By GABRIEL EWEPU, Abuja
THE Inspector General of Police, Mohammed Abubakar yesterday said the removal of roadblocks from the nation’s highways has reduced corruption in the Nigeria Police Force in the past one year after he assumed office.
Abubakar disclosed this during an interaction session at a ‘One Day Roundtable and Dinner’ organized by a non -governmental organization, CLEEN Foundation to mark the post-one year of his being in office.
Opining on the removal of roadblocks from highways across the country, Abubakar said it has drastically reduced accidental discharges and eliminated the N20 syndrome, as well as harassment of road users.
Abubakar said: “The withdrawal of police roadblocks has reduced 80 per cent corruption in the Nigeria Police These roadblocks were centres of corruption, which dented the image of the Force. With the removal of the roadblocks, the accidental discharge, harassment and human rights abuse have reduced as well.
“Measures are put in place for the past one year have led to drastic reduction in complaints against members of the Force, especially extra-judicious killings and N20 syndrome.
“In improving police image and enforcement of fundamental human rights, there has been increased media presence through proactive response to media and public enquiry, greater synergy between police and other security agencies.”
Meanwhile, CLEEN Foundation presented awards to deserving top 10 police stations in the Nigeria who participated in the Altus Police Visitors’ Week, 2012, and whose performance were assessed and met the standards set.
The Executive Director, CLEEN Foundation, Mrs Keme Okeyendo said the awards has been a yearly assesment done to evaluate the poerformance of the poloice across the country. Also to challenge other police officers to do more in their service.

Friday, 3 May 2013

COMMUNIQUÉ ISSUED AT THE END OF THE POLICING EXECUTIVE FORUM ON EXTERNAL POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY AND THE POLICE SERVICE COMMISSION


Introduction

The 7th Policing Executive Forum was held at Bolton White Hotels, Abuja, on Tuesday 30th April 2013 with the theme “External Police Accountability and the Police Service Commission”. The forum focused on fashioning ways to improve the civilian oversight function of the Police Service Commission in relation to policing services provision. Participants were drawn from the Ministry of Police Affairs, civil society groups from across the country and the Association of Retired Police Officers of Nigeria. Under the Chairmanship of Mr Fola Arthur Worrey of the Lagos State Security Trust Fund, the participants deliberated on issues relating to efficiency, effectiveness and the significance of the oversight function of the Police Service Commission. Papers were presented by a renowned criminologist, Professor Etannibi Alemika, and civil rights lawyer and activist, Mr Bamidele Aturu, as well as a former Chairman of the Police Service Commission, Chief Simeon Okeke. The Chairman of the House Committee on Police Affairs, Hon. Usman Bello Kumo, represented by Obadiah Mbila, also made contributions to the deliberations. These led to very insightful discussions.

Observations
At the end of the deliberations, the participants made the following observations:

1.      The Police Service Commission was established in 2001 after an 18-year military hiatus and should be commended for its achievements since then, including the development and adoption of guidelines for appointment, promotion and discipline in the Nigeria Police.
2.      Though the Police Service Commission is charged with appointment, promotion and discipline in the Nigeria Police Force (NPF), the forum observes that there is a general problem of tension in the implementation of its powers, vis-à-vis the police authorities as the independence of the Commission is yet to be recognised. For example, in issues of recruitment and discipline, there is still need for harmonisation of approaches between the PSC and NPF.
3.      Record keeping and efficient data infrastructure is still a challenge in the Commission. This indicates that there is still lack of institutional memory. There is lack of reliable data within the Commission and from the Nigeria Police to facilitate proper and efficient functioning of the Commission.
4.      The Police Service Commission needs financial and operational independence from the Executive and the Nigeria Police to enhance its authority and efficiency. 
5.      It was noted with concern that the Commission has limited ability to handle some cases brought to it by the public because it has not developed technical capacity to carry out its own investigations.
6.      The Commission has serious constraints in dealing with public complaints against the police or complaints by police officers. This undermines confidence in the Commission.
7.      The Commission has not been able to create necessary public awareness about its mandate and functions, especially resolving complaints against the police.
  
Recommendations
In the light of the foregoing, the Forum recommends as follows:

Composition
1.      All stakeholders should work for the independence of the Commission by advocating for an amendment to the Police Service Commission Act to address its composition.
2.      All appointments should be made in such a way as to strengthen the independence of the Commission. Particularly, the Chairman of the Commission should be a person with broad managerial experience. In the event that the Commission needs expert advice from the police, it should have the liberty to seek such service.

Appointment of Members
1.      It is recommended that a retired police officer should not be appointed as Chair of the Commission, in order to ensure effective oversight over the police.
2.      When members of the Commission represent specific interest groups, these groups must be consulted on such appointments and should have the power to recall any representative when they deem fit.
3.      The appointment process should be transparent, preferably with properly advertised vacancy notices.

Functions
1.      The Commission must have an independent investigative unit to look into complaints received by the Commission.
2.      An efficient, sustainable IT databank should be developed and sustained.
3.      In exercising the delegated powers of the Commission, the Nigeria Police should exercise caution and the Commission should ratify.
4.      The Commission should collaborate with the National Orientation Agency (NOA) for the purpose of receiving and transmitting complaints from the states and local governments of the Federation.
5.      Section 19 of the Police Service Commission Act which stipulates that the Commission can receive directives from the President and is duty-bound to comply with such directives impedes on the independence of the Commission and diminishes its powers. The provision should be abrogated as the Constitution conceives the Commission as an independent institution.
6.      The Commission should be given adequate budgetary allocation and financial independence.
7.      The National Assembly should begin the process of amending the Police Service Commission Act in order to enhance its independence.
8.      There is need for proper enlightenment within the Nigeria Police on the relationship between the police and the Commission.
9.      The Commission should develop effective and accessible complaints system, with the aid of information and communication (ICT).


Signed:

'Kemi Okenyodo
Executive Director
CLEEN Foundation

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